Books

An Arrangement of Skin

2016

An Arrangement of Skin embodies what thrills me most in the essay form—an artist trying, over and over, to find the different paths into the subterranean realms of her subconscious. An early and unlikely image—taxidermy—contains the essence of the various tensions that connect these thoughts. For Journey, taxidermy evokes that ineffable spark of life: call it a soul, a personality, a sentience. An Arrangement of Skin is by turns transformative and vital, and with it Journey takes her place alongside Biss, Jamison, and D’Ambrosio.”

—Nick Flynn, author of Another Bullshit Night in Suck City

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The Atheist Wore Goat Silk

2016

“I have been a big fan of Anna Journey’s work for some time, and The Atheist Wore Goat Silk only deepens that poetry crush. Journey brings me surprise after surprise in language so vivid, peculiar, truthful, and moving, that I gulp the poems down, a glutton for their strange energies and observations. Journey’s formal concision, intelligence, and decorum rub up against her speaker’s slightly feral interiority. It’s this instinctive wildness of soul that I think allows Journey to capture what others miss within seemingly ordinary moments and states of being. This is a terrific book by an important poet.”

— Erin Belieu, author of Slant Six

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Vulgar Remedies

2013

“Anna Journey, in her new book of poems, Vulgar Remedies, creates an alchemical self whose shimmering limbic/alembic lyrics distill the mysterious terrors of childhood, the dangerous passions of adults, into her own honey-dusk ‘voodun’: protective, purified to gold. Poetry is always a time machine: here we are invisible travelers to a bewitched past, a beautifully occluded future. These poems are erotic, vertiginous, revelatory, their dazzling lyric force reflecting profound hermetic life.”
— Carol Muske-Dukes, author of Twin Cities

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If Birds Gather Your Hair for Nesting

2009

“The tropic foliage of Anna Journey’s book is so lushly ashimmer with invitation and threat that it’s difficult to tell the two apart. Which is just what this poet intends: the world seduces us to enter, and to enter again, and to do so is both to find pleasure and to perish into a field of ghosts.”
— Mark Doty, author of Fire to Fire: New and Selected Poems

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